Squid | Definition, Order, Tentacles, Food, & Facts (2024)

cephalopod order

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  • squid - Children's Encyclopedia (Ages 8-11)
  • squid - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up)

Also known as: Teuthida, Teuthoidea

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Top Questions

What is a squid?

A squid is any of more than 300 species of 10-armed mollusks constituting the cephalopod orderTeuthoidea (or Teuthida). They are found in coastal and as well as oceanic waters. Squids may be swift swimmers or part of the drifting sea life.

What does a squid look like?

Squids have elongated tubular bodies and short compact heads with eyes on the sides of the head. Two of the ten arms have developed into long slender tentacles with expanded ends and four rows of suckers with toothed rings.

What is the smallest squid?

The smallest squid is the Southern pygmy squid (Idiosepius notoides). The males grow only to about 1.6 cm (less than 3/4 inch) in length.

What is the largest squid?

The largest squids are the giant squids and the colossal squids. They are also the largest living invertebrates. The largest recovered giant squids and colossal squids have measured nearly 13 metres (about 43 feet) long, but there are unconfirmed reports of individuals more than 20 metres (more than 65 feet) in length.

squid, any of more than 300 species of 10-armed cephalopods classified within the order Teuthoidea (or Teuthida) and found in both coastal and oceanic waters. Squids may be swift swimmers or part of the drifting sea life (plankton).

Squids have elongated tubular bodies and short compact heads. Two of the 10 arms have developed into long slender tentacles with expanded ends and four rows of suckers with toothed, horny rings. The body of most squids is strengthened by a feathery-shaped internal shell composed of a horny material. Squid eyes, almost as complex as human eyes, are usually set into the sides of the head.

Britannica QuizAnimal Group Names

Little is known of the life history of squids. Some attach their eggs to floating weeds and others to the ocean bottom. In some species the young resemble the adults at hatching, while in others there is a planktonic larval stage. The luminescent squids bear numerous light organs, which may be for recognition and for attracting prey (see also bioluminescence). Squids are numerous in the sea and serve as food for many animals, including the sperm whale, bony fishes, and human beings.

The smallest squid is the Southern pygmy squid (Idiosepius notoides); males grow only to about 1.6 cm (less than 3/4 inch) in length. The largest squids—giant squids and colossal squids—are also the largest living invertebrates. Some researchers place giant squids and colossal squids into the genus Architeuthis, whereas others separate them into the genera Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis respectively. The largest recovered giant squids and colossal squids have measured nearly 13 metres (about 43 feet) long, but there are unconfirmed reports of individuals more than 20 metres (more than 65 feet) in length.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Adam Augustyn.

Squid | Definition, Order, Tentacles, Food, & Facts (2024)
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